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Russian Volcano Erupts for the First Time Since 1924 And the Images Are Stunning – The Weather Channel

Russian Volcano Erupts for the First Time Since 1924 And the Images Are Stunning – The Weather Channel

Russia’s Raikoke Volcano erupted last weekend for the first time in 95 years.The various images acquired by astronauts and satellites are stunning.Raikoke’s ash plume was lofted 8 to 10 miles high.Raikoke Volcano on the Kuril Islands of Russia, south of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, erupted last weekend for the first time since 1924 and…

Uncommon Volcano Eruption Captured from ISS
  • Russia’s Raikoke Volcano erupted closing weekend for the predominant time in 95 years.
  • The assorted photos received by astronauts and satellites are stunning.
  • Raikoke’s ash plume used to be lofted 8 to 10 miles high.

Raikoke Volcano on the Kuril Islands of Russia, south of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, erupted closing weekend for the predominant time since 1924 and the photos from divulge have been out of this world.

A successfully-organized plume of ash and volcanic gases shot up from the stratovolcano’s 2,300-foot-extensive crater about 4 a.m. local time on Saturday, June 22, ending a dormant interval that had been ongoing for the previous 95 years.

Several satellites, to boot to astronauts aboard the International Situation Set of dwelling (ISS), captured stunning photos of this thick ash plume as it rose and at closing streamed eastward, pulled into a storm system over the North Pacific Ocean.

ISS astronauts shot the photograph under, which presentations the volcanic plume rising in a slim column and then spreading out in a phase of the plume generally known as the umbrella divulge. That is the divulge the establish the density of the ash plume turns into equal to that of the surrounding air, causing the plume to total rising, NASA talked about.

Astronauts aboard the International Situation Set of dwelling shot this photograph on Saturday, June 22, 2019, of the volcanic plume rising in a slim column and then spreading out in a phase of the plume generally known as the umbrella divulge.

(NASA Earth Observatory)

“The ring of white puffy clouds on the spoiled of the column would perhaps be a rate of ambient air being drawn into the column and the condensation of water vapor,” Simon Carn, a volcanologist at Michigan Tech, informed NASA Earth Observatory. “Or it would perhaps be a rising plume from interplay between magma and seawater because Raikoke is a small island and flows seemingly entered the water.”

This subsequent image used to be captured by the Life like Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite tv for computer on the morning of Saturday, June 22. NASA talked about the most concentrated ash used to be on the western edge of the plume, above Raikoke Volcano, on the time the image used to be received.

NASA’s Terra MODIS satellite tv for computer captured the ash plume above Raikoke Volcano on the morning of Saturday, June 22, 2019.

(NASA)

The image under is an indirect, composite search based solely totally on records from NASA’s Seen Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on its Suomi NPP satellite tv for computer and presentations the ash plume a few hours after the old image.

(MORE: Two Russian Volcanoes Left Their Label on Snow Quilt)

NASA’s Suomi NPP VIIRS satellite tv for computer captured the Raikoke ash plume on Saturday, June 22, 2019.

(NASA)

NOAA satellites also bought a peek of the Raikoke ash plume.

In the animation under from NOAA’s GOES-West satellite tv for computer, the japanese facet of the volcanic plume is seen as it rises high up into the atmosphere.

Even the Japanese Himawari-8 satellite tv for computer bought a shapely search of Raikoke’s successfully-organized ash plume spewing into the air, as seen within the following animation.

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Volcanic ash poses a most predominant hazard to aircraft because it contains attractive fragments of rock and volcanic glass, based solely totally on NASA.

The Tokyo and Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory facilities have been carefully monitoring the Raikoke plume, issuing messages to aviators to uncover them that the ash had reached an altitude of 8 miles. However, records from NASA’s CALIPSO satellite tv for computer counsel parts of the plume can also simply have been lofted as grand as 10 miles high.

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