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Kylie Minogue launches her own cosmetics range after winning trademark war

Never too late! Kylie Minogue launches her own cosmetics range after winning trademark war with Kylie Jenner over shared name

Her team successfully blocked cosmetics guru and reality star Kylie Jenner from trademarking the name ‘Kylie’ in 2017. 

And Kylie Minogue, 51, is making good use of her intellectual property, having recently launched her debut makeup range using the naming rights she won in court.  

Minogue’s cosmetics range appears on her official Step Back In Time tour website and features six items including a lip gloss, lip oil, cheek glitter and metallic eye shadow. 

Never too late! Kylie Minogue, 51, has launched her own cosmetics range after winning trademark war with Kylie Jenner over shared name. Pictured is Minogue's 'Wow' lip oil

Never too late! Kylie Minogue, 51, has launched her own cosmetics range after winning trademark war with Kylie Jenner over shared name. Pictured is Minogue’s ‘Wow’ lip oil  

The products are priced between $22 AUD and $28 AUD, and are named after some of Kylie’s most famous songs including Wow, Raining Glitter and Golden. 

While Minogue’s range contains several products that are similar to those sold by Kylie Jenner, the branding is very different. 

The Australian singer’s makeup branding appears to be inspired by pool parties, tropical locations and brightly-coloured desserts. 

The original glamazon! Kylie Minogue's (pictured) team successfully blocked cosmetics guru and reality star Kylie Jenner from trademarking the name 'Kylie' in 2017

Trademark: Kylie Jenner (pictured), 21, who is half-sister to Kim Kardashian West, applied to trademark the name Kylie, for her clothing and cosmetic businesses, in the US in April 2014

The original glamazon! Kylie Minogue’s team successfully blocked cosmetics guru and reality star Kylie Jenner from trademarking the name ‘Kylie’ in 2017

In contrast, Jenner’s products feature a more minimalistic branding aesthetic.  

Jenner, 21, who is half-sister to Kim Kardashian West, applied to trademark the name Kylie, for her clothing and cosmetic businesses, in the US in April 2014. 

In response, Minogue’s representatives sent the US Patent and Trademark Office a long list of reasons why the trademark should not be granted.

Similar names, different aesthetics: While Minogue's range contains several products that are similar to those sold by Kylie Jenner, the branding is very different. Pictured is Minogue's 'Stay Golden' eye and cheek glitter

Minimalist: Jenner's products feature a more minimalistic branding aesthetic. Pictured is Jenner's metallic liquid lipstick

Similar names, different aesthetics: While Minogue’s range contains several products that are similar to those sold by Kylie Jenner, the branding is very different. Pictured left is Minogue’s ‘Stay Golden’ eye and cheek glitter, right is Jenner’s metallic liquid lipstick   

Describing Jenner as ‘a secondary reality television personality’, the letter argued that, in contrast, Minogue was an ‘internationally-renowned performing artist, humanitarian and breast cancer activist known worldwide simply as ‘Kylie”.

In February 2017, the Patent Office rejected Jenner’s application. 

Prior to the legal battle, Minogue had released fragrances, furniture and clothes in the US, all baring her trademark name Kylie. 

Both Minogue and Jenner offer metallic eye shadow as part of their makeup ranges. Pictured is Minogue's 'Magnetic Electric' eyeshadows

Eye spy! Pictured is Jenner's 'Blue Honey' palette

Both Minogue and Jenner offer metallic eye shadow as part of their makeup ranges. Pictured left is Minogue’s ‘Magnetic Electric’ eyeshadows, Right is Jenner’s ‘Blue Honey’ palette 

Legal battle: In response to Jenner's trademark application, Minogue's representatives sent the US Patent and Trademark Office a long list of reasons why the trademark should not be granted

Legal battle: In response to Jenner’s trademark application, Minogue’s representatives sent the US Patent and Trademark Office a long list of reasons why the trademark should not be granted

Daily Mail UK

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