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Lego Masters’ head judge, ‘Brickman’ Ryan McNaught, shows off his amazing creations

Who is Australia’s legendary Brickman? Lego Masters’ head judge Ryan McNaught shows off his amazing creations – some of which are on display in museums around the world

Channel Nine’s Lego Masters debuted to stellar ratings earlier this week- and it’s easy to see why.

Hosted by comedian Hamish Blake and featuring remarkable Lego creations, the family-friendly show has captured the imaginations of Australians young and old.

But it is head judge Ryan McNaught (a.k.a. ‘The Brickman’) who is really impressing audiences the world over with his extraordinary constructions.

Who is Australia's legendary Brickman? Lego Masters' head judge Ryan McNaught has displayed his amazing creations in museums around the world. Pictured: One of Ryan's most famous designs, a scale model of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii

Who is Australia’s legendary Brickman? Lego Masters’ head judge Ryan McNaught has displayed his amazing creations in museums around the world. Pictured: One of Ryan’s most famous designs, a scale model of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii

The master Lego builder has recreated the ancient city of Pompeii, which was famously destroyed by a catastrophic volcanic eruption in AD 79.

The work features glowing lava flow courtesy of special LED lights placed under orange-coloured Lego bricks. 

Lego Pompeii, which takes pride of place in the Nicholson Museum at the University of Sydney, followed Ryan’s other Lego models of the Colosseum in Rome and the Acropolis in Greece. 

The expert: Lego Masters' head judge Ryan McNaught (a.k.a. 'The Brickman') has wowed audiences the world over with his extraordinary constructions

The expert: Lego Masters’ head judge Ryan McNaught (a.k.a. ‘The Brickman’) has wowed audiences the world over with his extraordinary constructions 

In The Brickman’s Wonders of the World Lego exhibition, audiences have been thrilled by Ryan’s scale models of the Golden Gate Bridge, Statue of David, Mona Lisa, Leaning Tower of Pisa and more.

Seven tonnes of Lego bricks were delivered in 40-foot shipping containers for the extraordinarily ambitious build.

The project took 4,200 man hours and about two million Lego bricks to complete.

Master builder! Lego Pompeii, which is displayed in the Nicholson Museum at the University of Sydney, followed Ryan's other Lego models of the Colosseum in Rome (pictured) and the Acropolis in Greece

Master builder! Lego Pompeii, which is displayed in the Nicholson Museum at the University of Sydney, followed Ryan’s other Lego models of the Colosseum in Rome (pictured) and the Acropolis in Greece

Plastic fantastic: In The Brickman's Wonders of the World Lego exhibition, audiences have been thrilled by Ryan's scale models of the Golden Gate Bridge, Statue of David, Mona Lisa, Leaning Tower of Pisa and more

Plastic fantastic: In The Brickman’s Wonders of the World Lego exhibition, audiences have been thrilled by Ryan’s scale models of the Golden Gate Bridge, Statue of David, Mona Lisa, Leaning Tower of Pisa and more

Ryan is particularly proud of his Lego version of the Sydney Opera House.

‘It is one of the hardest Lego models I’ve had to make,’ Ryan said in 2017. ‘It’s so hard because of its crazy shaped sails. They’re like orange peels.’

He also made a ‘cut-away’ of the Opera House, showing the various activities going on inside, including classical concert performance. 

Labour of love: Seven tonnes of Lego bricks were delivered in 40-foot shipping containers for the extraordinarily ambitious build. The project took 4,200 man hours and about two million Lego bricks to complete. Pictured: Backstage at the Wonders of the World Lego exhibition

Labour of love: Seven tonnes of Lego bricks were delivered in 40-foot shipping containers for the extraordinarily ambitious build. The project took 4,200 man hours and about two million Lego bricks to complete. Pictured: Backstage at the Wonders of the World Lego exhibition

Iconic structure: Ryan is particularly proud of his Lego version of the Sydney Opera House (pictured). 'It is one of the hardest Lego models I've had to make,' Ryan said in 2017. 'It's so hard because of its crazy shaped sails. They're like orange peels'

Iconic structure: Ryan is particularly proud of his Lego version of the Sydney Opera House (pictured). ‘It is one of the hardest Lego models I’ve had to make,’ Ryan said in 2017. ‘It’s so hard because of its crazy shaped sails. They’re like orange peels’

He even included a Lego version of Peter Allen singing on stage, wearing his trademark 1980s Hawaiian shirt.

‘Being Australian, I had to add someone very typically Australian on the inside of the Opera House and I’ve got none other than Peter Allen singing on stage,’ Ryan said.

Lego Masters continues Sunday at 7pm on Channel Nine 

Detailed delight: Ryan also made a 'cut-away' of the Opera House, showing the various activities going on inside, including classical concert performance

Detailed delight: Ryan also made a ‘cut-away’ of the Opera House, showing the various activities going on inside, including classical concert performance

Lego Masters continues Sunday at 7pm on Channel Nine. Pictured: Host Hamish Blake

Lego Masters continues Sunday at 7pm on Channel Nine. Pictured: Host Hamish Blake 

Daily Mail UK

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