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Muslim feminist Dr Susan Carland reveals the surprising link between Christianity and Islam

Muslim feminist, Dr. Susan Carland, 40, converted to Islam from Christianity at age 19, despite admittedly once viewing the religion as ‘barbaric, outdated and sexist.’

In the spirit of Ramadan, the wife of The Project’s Waleed Aly, 40, shared an Instagram post on Wednesday which revealed the surprising link between Christianity and Islam.

She shared a list of prophets who appear in both the holy Bible and the Quran.

Surprising link: In the spirit of Ramadan, Dr Susan Carland, the wife of The Project's Waleed Aly, revealed the link between Christianity and Islam on Wednesday. Pictured at the Australian High Commission's Buka Puasa (breaking of the fast dinner) in 2014

Surprising link: In the spirit of Ramadan, Dr Susan Carland, the wife of The Project’s Waleed Aly, revealed the link between Christianity and Islam on Wednesday. Pictured at the Australian High Commission’s Buka Puasa (breaking of the fast dinner) in 2014

‘The first prophet of Islam is Adam – yup [sic], the same one in the Bible,’ Susan wrote in the thought-provoking post.

‘Muslims also believe in Noah, Moses, David, Solomon, Jonah, John, and many other biblical prophets, and their stories appear in the Qur’an.’

She added the hashtag: ‘#ThingsYouMayNotKnowAboutIslam.’

In 2016, Melbourne-born Susan recalled the life-changing moment she began to question her Christian upbringing at age 17.

Fun fact: She shared a list of prophets who appear in both the holy Bible and the Quran

Fun fact: She shared a list of prophets who appear in both the holy Bible and the Quran

‘Was it because I genuinely believed it to be true or was it because it was what I was raised to believe?’ she told The Australian Women’s Weekly.

She decided to research other religions and did not immediately connect with Islam.

 ‘I thought, why would anyone want to be part of a barbaric, outdated, sexist religion?’ she said candidly.

Muslim power couple: Melbourne academic Susan is married to The Project's Waleed Aly (left) and they share two children, Aisha 14, and Zayd, 10. Pictured in February

Muslim power couple: Melbourne academic Susan is married to The Project’s Waleed Aly (left) and they share two children, Aisha 14, and Zayd, 10. Pictured in February 

The mother-of-two was later drawn to Islam’s ’emphasis on social justice’ and converted to the religion two years later, despite her mother’s ‘hesitations’. 

It comes after the Monash University academic made attempts to unite the Melbourne community in March, following the deadly terror attacks in Christchurch.

Susan attended a mosque open day at Benevolence Australia in Melbourne, for people of all faiths.

Convert: At age 19, Susan was drawn to Islam's 'emphasis on social justice' when she converted to the religion, despite her mother's 'hesitations'

Convert: At age 19, Susan was drawn to Islam’s ’emphasis on social justice’ when she converted to the religion, despite her mother’s ‘hesitations’

On its website, Benevolence is described as ‘a welcoming and inclusive space for spiritual growth’.

According to Facebook, this year’s mosque open day at Benevolence was designed ‘to provide a space for the Muslim community to gather together in this time of grief, and offer an opportunity for the wider community to engage in conversation on anything of topical interest, including themes of faith and contemporary issues, to unite and strengthen our shared humanity.’

Susan previously shared her views on body image during a discussion about the hijab. 

Using her platform: It comes after Susan attended a mosque open day at Benevolence Australia in Melbourne back in March, following the Christchurch terror attacks. Pictured right, Benevolence founding director, Saara Sabbagh

Using her platform: It comes after Susan attended a mosque open day at Benevolence Australia in Melbourne back in March, following the Christchurch terror attacks. Pictured right, Benevolence founding director, Saara Sabbagh

‘There are some women who say [wearing the hijab] is a feminist statement,’ she told Meshel Laurie on The Nitty Gritty Committee podcast. 

‘In a society where women’s bodies are used to sell everything from toothpaste to cars, [for those women] covering [their] body is about… saying, ‘I’ll decide who sees my body’.’

She continued: ‘And what parts they get to see by wearing a hijab and covering my body, I’m choosing to not have my body commodified in that way.’ 

Uniting the community: Melbourne-based academic Susan, who converted to Islam at age 19, spoke at the event, which was attended by dozens of people of all faiths

Uniting the community: Melbourne-based academic Susan, who converted to Islam at age 19, spoke at the event, which was attended by dozens of people of all faiths

Daily Mail UK

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